West Hollywood is famous for its laws aimed at protecting creatures big and small. It declared itself a “cruelty-free zone for animals” and passed a slew of animal-friendly laws including bans on cat declawing; the retail sale of cats and dogs; and, just this week, exotic- and wild-animal performances. But in the case of fur, the city’s zeal to protect animals is running up against its claim as a capital of high fashion. The boulevards in and around the city limits notably Beverly, Melrose and Robertson are lined with designer shops. Although some residents praise the city’s socially conscious stand on fur, the ban has angered many business owners. Retailers with multiple locations are busily moving fur products to stores outside West Hollywood. Independent boutiques, such as Darrel Adams’ Kin store on Sunset Boulevard, are seeing if suppliers will take back some of the fall fur coats on order. Furs make up a small fraction of Adams’ collections but are among the priciest items. “The furs are sometimes the most expensive pieces in the collection, so it affects sales dramatically, especially if you sell it at a larger percentage,” he said. “To cut off someone’s big-ticket item makes it hard for a business to survive.” Darren Gold, chairman of the board of the West Hollywood Design District, said the city has worked hard to establish itself as a premier fashion destination, attracting a collection of both established luxury brands and independent designers. The ban, he said, is a slap in the face. “It’s detrimental to our image as a West Coast fashion capital and could prevent fashion houses from choosing West Hollywood,” Gold said. Despite its politically incorrect connotations, fur continues to be a mainstay on the catwalk.

So it was no surprise when the Oscar winner and Emmy nominee walked the red carpet Saturday at a tea hosted by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. “House of Cards” is one of many British imports that have inspired American television in recent years. And Spacey called its unique release the entire series was posted on Netflix at once and nine Emmy nominations a “landmark moment.” The British original aired over three seasons during the 1990s. “I think it’s a sign that things are shifting and moving into lots of different platforms and different ways for audiences to discover what they want to watch and how they want to watch it,” Spacey said. “They want to be in control so you better give them control or they’ll go somewhere else.” Kerry Washington, Jon Voight, Alfre Woodard and stars of the hit British period drama “Downton Abbey” were at the BAFTA event too the day before Sunday’s Emmy awards in Los Angeles. They ate finger foods and wore sunglasses at a posh Los Angeles hotel, shielding themselves from the California sun under large white umbrellas. Each seemed to have their favorite British television show. Allison Holker of “So You Think You Can Dance” said she loves the original British version of “The Office.” So does “Breaking Bad” star Dean Norris, who called it one of his “favorite shows of all time.” Norris said he’s also hoping to find the time to watch “Dr. Who.” Actor Reid Scott of “Veep” said he really loves BBC’s “Sherlock Holmes.” Scott even had his own theories about why Americans are embracing, and even copying, British humor. “I think American comedy has really taken a page from British comedy in that we demand intelligent comedy now,” Scott said. “It’s not so slapsticky. It’s not so bawdy anymore.” That begs the question: What will be the next British television invasion to find fans in America? Even “Downton Abbey” creator Julian Fellowes said he doesn’t know. ___

WeHo ban on exotic animal displays comes after rowdy meeting

A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. 2 To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs ‘Prisoners’ takes box office hostage as Hollywood gets dark In ‘Prisoners’, two young girls are kidnapped, and one dad takes justice into his own hands. The film stars Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Terrence Howard and Maria Bello. Scott Bowles, USA TODAY 4:57 p.m. EDT September 22, 2013 As summer fades and studios enter the fall and awards season, studios begin releasing more adult fare. ‘Prisoners,’ starring Hugh Jackman, was No. 1 at the box office. (Photo: Wilson Webb) “Prisoners” appeals to adult audiences after summer of teen fare “Insidious Chapter 2” hung on for second place “Wizard of Oz” re-release followed the yellow brick road SHARE 45 CONNECT 38 TWEET 2 COMMENTEMAILMORE Hollywood began its seasonal migration to more adult fare this weekend as the fall-oriented Prisoners scored a convincing win at the box office. The crime drama starring Hugh Jackman and Jake Gyllenhaal collected $21.4 million, according to studio estimates from ticket talliers Hollywood.com. The haul slightly exceeded analysts’ expectations, propelled by strong reviews as Prisoners marked one of fall’s first awards contenders. According to survey site Rottentomatoes.com, Prisoners won over 79% of critics and an impressive 90% of moviegoers a strong public reaction to a dark, R-rated film that runs 2 hours long. MORE: The weekend’s top 10 films The film benefited from public hunger to get away from summer’s big-budget spectacles, says Tim Briody, analyst for ticket trackers Boxofficeprophets.com.