Muse to Release Concert Film

Mrs. Carter’s bad-luck streak may seem like an anomaly (her Latin American tour has continued without incident and stops in Venezuela tonight and Colombia on Sunday), but in fact, these crazed fan incidents happen to nearly every pop star. Concertgoers have rushed the stage at Miley Cyrus , Demi Lovato and Taylor Swift shows. Justin Bieber was attacked by a fan during a Dubai performance, resulting in an upturned piano. Even One Direction’s Harry Styles suffered a blow to the groin after a concertgoer threw a shoe at him in February. “They want to get as close as possible,” says Gary Bongiovanni, editor of Pollstar, which covers the concert industry. “It’s just a fan being overly exuberant that could in fact hurt the performer or anyone else around them if they don’t act rationally. But it’s not based on hate or a desire to do the performer harm.” Although most excited devotees don’t present a serious threat, some encounters have ended tragically. One crazed fan charged the stage at a Columbus, Ohio, concert for heavy-metal band Damageplan in 2004, fatally shooting guitarist “Dimebag” Darrell Abbott and three others. Other incidents have resulted in brutal injuries, such as a fan who was beaten up after climbing onstage at a Snoop Dogg show in 2005 and another who suffered a concussion when Akon threw a prankster onto her at a 2007 show. The key is to “let audiences know what their limitations are,” as Beyonce did by tossing her bottom-slapper out of the Denmark concert, says Paul Wertheimer, founder of Crowd Management Strategies, a safety consulting service specializing in concerts and festivals. Beyonce allowed the fan who grabbed her to stay for the remainder of the show (even shaking his hand and telling him, “It’s all right … Thank you, I love you, too”), but Wertheimer believes it could have sent the wrong signal, potentially emboldening other fans to try similar stunts. “It’s a gamble for an artist when they allow that to occur,” Wertheimer says. “When Beyonce does her well-meaning, no-damage-done kind of thing, it sends a message to the audience that they can do it, and that someone else can try and do it.

Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall is inextricably of L.A.

Ethan Miller/Getty Images for Clear Channel Muse played their second-to-last American concert date of the year at iHeartRadio in Las Vegas last night, and after next month’s Austin City Limits , it might be a while before fans see them again Stateside. “Next year, we may do one festival or two, but were probably going to concentrate on getting into a new album,” Muses Matt Bellamy told Rolling Stone backstage at iHeartRadio. But fans will get a chance to experience a Muse concert in almost lifelike form, since the band will be releasing a concert film. “Over the summer, we played this massive gig in Rome Olympic Stadium, that was probably the best gig of the year,” Bellamy said. “Its gonna come out in 4K, which is the highest resolution concert ever shot. Its four times more powerful than HD, so its like ridiculous detail. When you see the concert being filmed, you can see all the crowd, you can see their faces being filmed.” See Where Muse Ranks on Our List of the 50 Greatest Live Acts Right Now The exact release plans are still up in the air, but Bellamy said he expects it to get a limited theatrical release in the U.S., including some Imax screens. It’s a rare occurence for a festival-headlining band big enough to have its own concert film to serve as an opening act, but Muse did so last night in Vegas when they performed before Queen.”Events like this didnt exist a few years ago and we are playing withtechnically opening forQueen tonight,” Bellamy said before the show. “At any point in our career, I wouldnt have thought wed actually get a chance to play with them.” The eclecticism of the iHeart lineup, which also included Elton John this year, proved an educational experience for Muse’s drummer, Dominic Howard.”Having some of those older greats on stage and seeing them play is wicked, because you can still learn so much from a lot of those kind of people that have been around for a while and got more experience than you,” he said. Bellamy also finds it inspiring. “Its odd because when you start out, you perceive those acts as being something really quite long before we even were born, but also well before we started,” he said. “And to somehow end up on a bill with them is quite strange because it makes you think, ‘How old are these people?’ I suppose it gives you hope for making music as an old person.”

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More photos When Gehry was named one of the finalists in the competition to design a new building for the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 1988, he was keenly aware of the typical objections to his work. In an early presentation of his proposal, he made a point of saying that his buildings “aren’t from Mars.” He emphasized how much his career was “bound to this city.” He was, in fact, the only local architect among the four finalists. His initial design, quite different from what was ultimately built, imagined a small village for classical music at the top of Bunker Hill. At the center was a conservatory holding a lobby and topped with a sloping roof. The auditorium was pushed back toward 2nd and Hope streets and clad in limestone. A pedestrian bridge reached over 1st Street to Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. A glass dome crowned a single-story restaurant along Grand. Panorama: Inside Walt Disney Concert Hall with Frank Gehry Even in this embryonic form it was easy to see the influence on Gehry of Hans Scharoun’s 1963 Berlin Philharmonic. Scharoun produced for postwar West Germany a low-slung, open-hearted concert hall that was determined to look anti-monumental and avoid any comparison to the Nazi landmarks of the 1930s. Interview with Frank Gehry Frank Gehry on the making of Disney Hall Architect Frank Gehry discusses the creation of Walt Disney Concert Hall. Interview by Mark Swed. Gehry aimed to do something similar, but for cultural rather than political reasons. He wanted his design to protect the idea of the concert hall as refuge but also to embody the essential informality of Los Angeles.

It was the New York premiere of the “Monotone-Silence Symphony.” Conceived by the late French artist Yves Klein (1928-1962), the symphony requires 70 musicians and singers to take turns hold a single sound for TWENTY minutes, followed by another twenty minutes of DEAD SILENCE. The piece was performed just once in Klein’s own lifetime, in Paris in 1960, accompanied by three nude models smearing themselves with Klein’s signature blue paint. New York art gallery owner Dominique Levy was the moving force behind this past week’s performance: “I thought that was the craziest and most unreasonable thing to ever do,” Levy said. “How can you expect people to even bear 20 minutes of one note and 20 minutes of silence? And then I was lucky enough to experience it approximately, I think, ten years ago. And it was a life-changing experience.” Life-changing enough that she organized the concert to coincide with an exhibition of Klein’s paintings and sculptures — most of them blue. “If you think about it, it’s one single tone,’ Levy said. “And he works in monochromatic color, one single color.” And so to Wednesday night’s performance in a Manhattan church (minus the distraction of the three nude models in blue). Together, the voices and instruments had a mesmerizing effect over time. To listen to Yves Klein’s “Monotone-Silence Symphony,” click on the audio player. Audio recording courtesy of Bill Siegmund, of Digital Island Studios, New York.