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Georgia Tech student Chance Shafor, the first in line in Atlanta’s Lenox Square, said he wants a gold iPhone 5S because it’s “new and shiny.” Retailers including Best Buy ( BBY , Fortune 500 ) will also have the new iPhones, as will carriers AT&T ( T , Fortune 500 ), Verizon ( VZ , Fortune 500 ), Sprint ( S , Fortune 500 ) and T-Mobile ( TMUS ). But their inventory usually sells out more quickly. Related story: Pay someone to wait in line for your new iPhone 5S sells out in London: Scores of Apple fans in London went home disappointed after the iPhone 5S sold out at the city’s flagship store in under two hours. The gold version of the 5S was first to go as several thousand people lined up outside the store on Regent Street. After standing in the queue for six hours, London university student Waleed Tariq was pleased to have snapped up a 5S, dismissing the more affordable model. “The 5C stands for 5 cheap. It’s plastic and it looks cheap. I’m definitely not interested in that one,” the 17-year-old said. Waiting in line today? Queues in London, mostly made up of men, snaked down a side street and were funneled into a nearby square. Coffee stations were set up to serve the waiting crowds. Many in London were buying iPhones just so they could resell them later, though Apple imposed a two-phone limit on customers. Some of those sellers pitched tents outside stores for days on end.

New York judge denies request to shut down Dish Hopper

Richard Parrinello, of Brookhaven, New York, kept the snakes in his detached garage, all neatly stacked in containers and at the right temperature, according to Roy Gross, chief of the Suffolk County SPCA. Burmese pythons are illegal in New York, and Parrinello’s were taken from the house to a reptile sanctuary in Massachusetts while the rest of the snakes are still in his garage, according to Jack Krieger, communications director for the Town of Brookhaven on Long Island. Gross said all the snakes appeared to be in good health and there was no animal abuse or neglect. “It was a well-maintained facility, it was very clean and organized, it was a business,” Krieger said. By the numbers: Pets Parrinello kept an online website, “Snakeman’s Exotics,” which advertised a collection of pythons, boa constrictors and hognose snakes available for sale both domestically and internationally. After weeks of investigation into alleged workers compensation fraud, the town of Brookhaven, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Suffolk County Police and the SPCA executed a search warrant in Parrinello’s home, where he lives with his wife and 10-year-old son, according to a news release from Brookhaven. Undercover investigators spoke to Parrinello, who claimed to have $500,000 in inventory stored on the premises, including snakes, turtles and turtle eggs, the news release said. Authorities also say they found a few tarantulas and a couple of freezers with frozen mice and alligator carcasses. Krieger said Parrinello wasn’t arrested or charged with any criminal activity, but he was running a business out of his residence in a residential area, which is a violation of the town code. Town Law Department officials are still investigating and will likely issue numerous violations in the coming days. When reached by telephone, Parrinello declined to comment. “What makes this case especially egregious is that this individual was allegedly operating this reptile business out of his home, posing an unknown threat to the neighbors of this community,” said Brookhaven Supervisor Ed Romaine. Peter Constantakes, spokesman for the DEC, said Parrinello was interviewed and issued two summonses for possessing wild animals without a permit and for possessing alligator parts without a permit, each one carrying a maximum fine of $250. The U.S.

New York Photos of the Week, September 14th – September 20th

The ruling, released Wednesday by US District Judge Laura Swain, denied ABC’s request for the injunction, which would have put a temporary hold on the sale of the devices. This is another win for Dish, which has been embroiled in multiple lawsuits with broadcast companies over its ad-skipping technology called AutoHop. In addition to ABC, CBS (the parent company of CNET), and other companies have filed separate suits against Dish over its AutoHop feature. A judge in California also ruled in favor of Dish in July by rejecting Fox’s appeal of a similar decision to not serve an injunction against the Hopper. Related stories T-Mobile CEO: I’m open to deals with Dish, Sprint ABC told CNET that the fight’s far from over. “Today’s ruling is only a preliminary decision and the first step in the judicial process,” an ABC spokesperson said in an e-mail when asked about Wednesday’s ruling. “We continue to firmly believe that Dish’s AutoHop and PrimeTime Anytime services breach our retransmission consent agreement with Dish, infringe upon ABC’s copyrights, and unfairly compete with the authorized on-demand and commercial-free options currently offered by ABC and its licensees.” CBS, however, did get a small victory from Wednesday’s ruling. The New York judge also denied Dish’s motion to throw out the broadcaster’s claim that Dish allegedly concealed the ad-skipping technology during contract negotiations . This means CBS can continue with its suit against Dish on this particular issue. CBS applauded the decision in a statement sent to CNET. “We are very pleased with today’s decision, which allows CBS to proceed with its fraudulent concealment claim,” CBS said in a statement. “This ruling allows us to show in trial that what Dish knew and what Dish said it knew are two absolutely different things and give reason to unwind a deceptive contract.” When contacted by CNET, Dish did not comment on the matter. Dish’s general counsel, R. Stanton Dodge, did issue a statement earlier regarding the preliminary injunction. “This decision is yet another victory for American consumers, and we are proud to have stood by their side in this important fight over the fundamental rights of consumer choice and control,” Dodge said.

850 snakes part of New York man’s home business, authorities say

It was a pilot run for what the restaurant hopes to make a monthly event. (Keith Bedford for The Wall Street Journal) Seferino Cotzojay, assistant winemaker at Bedell Cellars, loads harvested grapes into a crusher on Wednesday. Mr. Cotzojay has been working at Bedell since 2005, when he answered an ad for a worker that had been posted in the local paper. (Gordon M. Grant for The Wall Street Journal) Michal Litwiniec, left, Marek Otwinowski, Pawel Czepukowski and Igor Gawlikowski, members of the Polish group Karbido, rehearse at their musical table, which has a bass attachment and hidden strings. The group performs in the U.S. for the first time this week. (Keith Bedford for The Wall Street Journal) Participants in Harlems African American Day Parade are pictured Sunday. Former city Comptroller Bill Thompson appeared at a breakfast for the eventon Monday announced he would be bowing out of the race for mayor. (PJ Smith for The Wall Street Journal) Former World Wrestling Foundation wrestler Bruno Sammartino is pictured with memorabilia at the Italian American Museum in New York on Sunday. Columnist Ralph Gardner met the wresting legend during Little Italys San Gennaro festival. (Keith Bedford for The Wall Street Journal) The blistered shishito peppers at Milkflower, a new pizzeria in Astoria, Queens, owned and operated by brothers Peter and Danny Aggelatos.